hide

Read Next

Spiraling Into Control

I wrote this as a guest post on the Beeminder blog — comments can live there.

It’s dark. Warm. Safe. You’re in bed, about to fall asleep. Pre-dream hallucinations of commanding a mighty bear army are playing across your sated mind. Zz — wait — what about that CrossFit Beeminder?!

You forgot. You got behind. You skipped CrossFit yesterday, but Beeminder said that was okay as long as you did it today instead. You meant to, but life happened. At this point, you think, “I am sumptuously swaddled in my favorite luxury bedding material, it’s late, and there is no way I’m going out in the street to do the workout-of-the-day in the dark, by myself, in my pajamas. And Beeminder will just charge me $5 this time. Okay, deal. Zzz.”

But I think there’s a better way to use Beeminder. When this happened to me, I didn’t even have to think about what to do; I just found myself out there grunting my medicine ball against a telephone pole and jumprope-sprinting into gloomy rosebushes. [1] It wasn’t even worth considering losing my wager over the tiny matter of some physical discomfort. What wager? Not money — just the certainty that I will always do what I promise myself I will do.

If you have too many goals you're not doing, read this

On SEBASTIAN MARSHALL

Got an email from a reader who has about 30 goals. They're all good. But he's wondering how he can do them all. My reply:

Okay. Feedback.

So, your goal - anyone's goal - is basically to get the most success you can as quickly as you can in the way most suitable/enjoyable to you, right?

I ask because that's pretty obvious, you probably want to do that. But you've got a lot of goals, and some of them are quite big and significant.

What I've found is trying to change 10 things at once - and have big changes that'll take years to complete - is not the the best way to get the most success as quickly as possible in the most suitable/enjoyable way.

Rendering New Theme...