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First Year Book Sales

On nickwinter.net

I always love it when people share revenue data for their apps / games / books / works, and it's been a year since The Motivation Hacker came out, so here's an updated graph of first year ebook sales by platform:

Last time I posted six months in, right after that spike in August, and I was sure it was some temporary press thing and figured my book could head into quiet retirement shortly. But the last six months have sold more than the first, which was quite surprising to me. People must be continuing to recommend it to their other people.

As I've gone from 40 total reviews to 124, the book's rating went from 4.9 to 4.5 on Amazon and 4.29 to 3.90 on Goodreads. This is much more in line with the actual quality of the book (although still a little high on Amazon); perhaps it regressed to the mean, or perhaps friends of friends of friends are more critical of my stuff.

So yeah, 2412 sales in the first year at ~$2.21 profit per sale, which given ~$620 in direct costs and 195 hours of work means I've made $24.16 per hour so far, up from the gorgeous $8.36 per hour I'd calculated from the first six months. That's not bad at all, given my expectations.

Goodbye 2012

On Tynan

I'm sitting by a crackling fire at my aunt and uncle's house in New Jersey and we're just a couple hours into the new year, which means that it's a perfect time to review the year and look forward.

If I were to title my year, I'd call it the year I got serious. Something interesting happened near the end of 2011-- I realized that I wasn't actually on track for a lot of my goals, that I was going to have to actually get serious about stuff, and that this seriousness had to come in the form of action, not talk. I ended 2011 with a few months of solid productivity under my belt, and a year-end post that optimistically predicted a productive year.

I'm happy to say that the productive year materialized, and that my focus on getting serious has intensified.

When I was young, maybe third grade or so, a psychologist did a study at my middle school. We answered some questions and were offered two choices: a small prize now or a large prize later. I took the small prize now. I think knew it was the wrong move at the time, but the pack of stickers on the table looked like a lot of fun. Later on the big prizes were given to the waiters in such a way that I was able to see what they got. Sure enough, their prizes were a lot better and my stickers were long gone.

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